New Facebook Page for Women Historians of Health and Medicine

Dear WHOHM,
We now have a Facebook page.   Click on the link, then click on “join group” at the top of the page.
Also, to clarify, the WHOHM listserv will continue to function, and we hope that you will make announcements there as well.  We have some members who are not active on Facebook.
Yours,
Lara
Published in: on June 10, 2014 at 10:15 am  Leave a Comment  

WHOM book announcments

Dear Colleagues,

A rare mass email from me to deliver the exciting news that my book, Pathologist of the Mind: Adolf Meyer and the Origins of American Psychiatry, will be published soon by Johns Hopkins University Press.

Sincerely,

Susan Lamb, PhD.

SSHRC Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

————————-

Dear WHOMers,
 
Because other professional commitments will keep me from AAHM this year, I am using this venue to announce (with great excitement) that my first book, Banking on the Body:  The Market in Blood, Milk and Sperm in Modern America, was published YESTERDAY by Harvard University Press, and should be at the book table at AAHM.  
 
The press site is below; the amazon link is here
 
Since I will miss the WHOM breakfast, I would like to use this less personal means to express my gratitude for the support I have received from this group as the project moved from dissertation to book.  Individually and collectively, I have been inspired and pushed by your scholarship, professionalism, and collegiality.  Thank you.
 
Best,
 
Kara 
 
Kara W. Swanson, J.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Northeastern University School of Law
400 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115
(617) 373-8288
 
Harvard University Press, 2014:
 

Department of History and Classical Studies
McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Published in: on June 2, 2014 at 1:58 pm  Leave a Comment  

Job openings at Grand Valley State College

Job 1:

Grand Valley State University Visiting Assistant Professorships, 2014-2015 European, World and Medieval History

The Department of History at Grand Valley State University invites applications for full-time Visiting (non-tenure-track) appointments for the 2014-2015 academic year, with the possibility for renewal, at the rank of Visiting Assistant Professor (or at the rank of Visiting Instructor if ABD). The teaching load of four courses per semester will include surveys in European, World and Medieval History. Grand Valley State University is an affirmative action and equal opportunity institution. The Department is especially interested in qualified candidates who can contribute to the intellectual diversity and excellence of the academic community.

Interested candidates are asked to submit a letter of application, teaching materials (examples include statement of teaching philosophy, syllabi, assignments) and curriculum vitae, followed by three letters of reference and a transcript, to:

Dr. William Morison, Chair

Department of History

Grand Valley State University

MAK D-1-220

Allendale, Michigan 49401-9403.

 Applications will be reviewed until Thursday, May 22.

For further information please call 616-331-3298 or email

Dr. William Morison at morisonw@gvsu.edu.

 

 

Job 2:

Grand Valley State University Visiting Assistant Professorships, 2014-2015 World History and/or American History Surveys

The Department of History at Grand Valley State University invites applications for full-time Visiting (non-tenure-track) appointments for the 2014-2015 academic year, with the possibility for renewal, at the rank of Visiting Assistant Professor (or at the rank of Visiting Instructor if ABD). The teaching load of four courses per semester will include surveys in World History and/or American History. Depending on the candidate’s areas of expertise, course assignments could also include one or more of the following courses: History of Science and Research Methods in History. Grand Valley State University is an affirmative action and equal opportunity institution. The Department is especially interested in qualified candidates who can contribute to the intellectual diversity and excellence of the academic community.

Interested candidates are asked to submit a letter of application, teaching materials (examples include statement of teaching philosophy, syllabi, assignments) and curriculum vitae, followed by three letters of reference and a transcript, to:

Dr. William Morison, Chair

Department of History

Grand Valley State University

MAK D-1-220

Allendale, Michigan 49401-9403.

 

Applications will be reviewed until Thursday, May 22.

For further information please call 616-331-3298 or email

Dr. William Morison at morisonw@gvsu.edu.

 

Published in: on May 16, 2014 at 10:27 am  Leave a Comment  

New Blog and E-Newsletter

Dear WHOM,

I have started a new blog with the historian’s perspective on sex, reproduction and women’s health in America.   I also have a monthly e-newsletter that will have updates on my book-in-progress, Counting Chickens Before They Hatch?: Miscarriage in American Culture.  If you are interested, you can email me directly to sign up, or do it on my blog.

I hope you’ll take a look, and consider signing up for the newsletter, so you’ll be the first to know when the book is published!  As a bonus, signing up will help show publishers that our field has wide appeal — I am aiming to publish with a trade press, to reach more readers, and trade presses want hard evidence that authors, and books, will have an audience.

Yours,

Lara

Lara Freidenfelds, Ph.D.

lara@post.harvard.edu

www.larafreidenfelds.com

Published in: on March 27, 2014 at 11:47 am  Leave a Comment  

Wikipedia edit-a-thon

Dear WHOM Colleagues,
I just stumbled on this notice of a Wikipedia edit-a-thon that the History of Science Dept is sponsoring at Oklahoma next month: .  “The event is open to anyone who wishes to help preserve women’s history! No Wiki editing experience necessary; as needed, tutorials will be provided for Wikipedia newcomers. Female editors are particularly encouraged to attend. Can’t be there the whole time? No problem. Join us for as little or as long as you like.  The first hour will be focused on introducing newbies to Wikipedia tenets and markup  language.”
I went to my first Edit-a-thon at the Brooklyn Museum earlier this month and it really was a life-changing experience.  As I said to the organizer later, better to engage with Wikipedia than to grumble at its inaccuracies.  That experience gave me the courage to take on what had been a truly awful page dedicated to the Trotula texts:   And I was able to create a new page for the real historic woman, Trota, who previously had been invisible because nobody contributing to Wikipedia was engaging with the most recent scholarship: .
Engaging with Wikipedia isn’t quite as “easy” as everyone says.  You need to figure that you’ll have to spend a number of days getting fully up-to-speed with the editing protocols, etc.  But I highly recommend that we all begin to engage with it.  After all, this is the best way to make sure that feminist scholarship gets incorporated into basic cultural narratives.
—-
Monica H. Green
Member, 2013-14
School of Historical Studies
Institute for Advanced Study
Einstein Drive
Princeton, NJ 08540
office:  (609) 734-8192
e-mail:  monica.green@asu.edu
http://independent.academia.edu/MonicaGreen1
http://www.slu.edu/x68617.xml#monica
http://nyamcenterforhistory.org/2013/08/07/seeing-with-new-eyes-rediscovering-medieval-manuscripts-in-a-digital-age/
——————————————

I wholeheartedly agree that we need to get on board trying to improve this resource.   Lament as I may the fact that students seem to rely on it way too much, it makes more sense to step up and improve it.   I wonder if it might be worth it to start compiling a list of entries we think need improving so that if someone has the time or a particular interest, they might agree to take it on.

I spent so much time on a couple of entries last year, that I had it put into my performance plan for this year!

Suzanne Junod

___________________________

Just to cheer you on — it’s not just students who rely on Wikipedia.  I know I go to it when I need a quickie background picture of a topic that’s outside my field.  I would highly value all of your entries!
Lara
___________________________

Speaking of Wikipedia edit-a-thons, Claire Potter and I are hosting one at the Berkshire Conference this spring.  It will be Saturday afternoon from 2-5pm.I’ll also be discussing Wikiproject Women’s History as part of a session on Medical History in Other Venues at AAHM.

Heather Munro Prescott

Published in: on March 6, 2014 at 4:26 pm  Leave a Comment  

How Long Can you wait to have a baby — historical data


From: Karen Reeds [mailto:karenmreeds@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 10:19 AM
To: whom-request@umich.edu
Subject: Re: how long can you wait to have a baby — historical data

Courtesy of my daughter (due in August!)

>
> JEAN TWENGE The Atlantic JUN 19 2013
> Jean M. Twenge is a professor of psychology at San Diego State
> University and the author of The Impatient Woman’s Guide to Getting
> Pregnant.
>
> “The widely cited statistic that one in three women ages 35 to 39 will
> not be pregnant after a year of trying, for instance, is based on an
> article published in 2004 in the journal Human Reproduction. Rarely
> mentioned is the source of the data: French birth records from 1670 to
> 1830. The chance of remaining childless-30 percent-was also calculated
> based on historical populations.”

Karen Reeds
karenmreeds@gmail.com

————————-

Comment from Daphna Oren-Magidor [daphna_oren_magidor@alumni.brown.edu]

It is certainly true that demographic studies have used historical data in
order to look at dropping fertility rates. This is true not only for this
French study, but also for other notable demographic studies of fertility,
such as J. Trussell and C. Wilson, “Sterility in a Population with Natural
Fertility,” Population Studies 39: 2 (1985).

However, it is perhaps worthwhile understanding what historical-data studies
usually aim to do. The purpose of studies that use historical data is to
figure out how fecundity works in populations that practice natural
fertility, i.e in which there are no effective means of contraception on the
one hand, and no effective fertility treatments on the other hand. It is
assumed that such populations offer a view of what the body “actually” does,
without any additional aids or hindrances. Now, granted, this fails to take
into account the fact that modern nutrition and health systems may allow for
greater natural fertility. For example, the age in which girls begin to
menstruate (i.e – to become potentially fertile) has been steadily dropping.
It is not unlikely that the age in which women stop being fertile is
similarly become more delayed and that women’s natural fertility today is
greater than it was two or three or four hundred years ago. And yet, it is
important to understand where the data are coming from and what they are
used for.

This is not to say that I have any particular objection to Twenge’s
conclusions – other, perhaps, than the fact that they don’t seem
particularly new to me. They seem to echo what I’ve seen on websites
regarding conception etc.

However,  I’m not entirely sure if using historical-data studies is as
irrational as Twenge suggests. If nothing else, when we look at Western
Europe, especially places like England, some marriage patterns were
surprisingly similar to our own. The average age of marriage in large parts
of early modern Europe was roughly 23-24 for women, and 27-28 for men. In
other words, not unlike today, many couples did not start having children
until well into their 20s. Thus, it is not necessarily true that people
would be done with their childbearing at an early age. And given the lack of
effective contraception, it is unlikely that people could entirely avoid
getting pregnant if they were having sexual activity.

It is also worth noting that early modern guides to conception were
surprisingly supportive of women conceiving late. For example, The English
Midwife notes that ” “there are however many Women, which seem Barren for a
long time. yea till 35 or 40 years old, and sometimes longer who yet at last
conceive.”

Again, this is not to argue with Twenge’s conclusions, but merely to give
some perspective to the question of historical data and fertility.

Daphna

Published in: on July 1, 2013 at 10:50 am  Leave a Comment  

Blogpost: Intersex case in South Carolina

Dear all,
Here is a blogpost I wrote about the very important case in South Carolina.  I am at the AAHM right now, and I thought some of you here might be interested. Also, if you haven’t seen this blog, Nursing Clio, you can check it out.
Best, Lizzie
Elizabeth Reis
2012-2013 Visiting Scholar, History of Science Department, Harvard University
Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies Department
University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
Published in: on May 20, 2013 at 9:21 am  Leave a Comment  

Women Historians’ Breakfast at AAHM

Dear WHOM,
I look forward to seeing many of you at AAHM this week!  Don’t forget to come to the Women Historians’ Breakfast, Saturday morning, 7-8 a.m.  Please encourage students to come, even though it’s terribly early in the morning!  This is a wonderful chance for networking and mentoring.
Yours,
Lara
Lara Freidenfelds, Ph.D.
lara@post.harvard.edu
https://webmail.ccsu.edu/owa/redir.aspx?C=l2yQAGZzqEiG98lS9i6a-S7hiG4qJdBIptXSLLIQ5iLMuP_7BQZbqU-qklCdhiVfz4rn8MU8hrY.&URL=http%3a%2f%2fwww.themodernperiod.com” target=”_blank”>http://www.themodernperiod.com
Published in: on May 15, 2013 at 1:41 pm  Leave a Comment  

Commentary: Egg Freezing

 

Colleagues,
Something of interest from the medical anthropology list.
Monica Green
Some on this list might be interested to read Marcia Inhorn’s recent CNN
commentary, “Women, Consider Freezing Your Eggs,” and a response
that Lynn Morgan and I have published in The Feminist Wire
Published in: on April 22, 2013 at 11:48 am  Leave a Comment  

CFP: Beyond Roe: Reproductive Justice in a Changing World

Beyond Roe: Reproductive Justice in a Changing World

Throughout 2013, five law schools in the Delaware Valley will hold events exploring various aspects of reproductive justice in the 40 years post-Roe v. Wade. The final event in this series is a conference sponsored by the Rutgers School of Law – Camden that will take place on Friday, October 11 on the Rutgers campus in Camden, New Jersey.

We are pleased to invite proposals for papers and panels. The conference theme is Beyond Roe: Reproductive Justice in a Changing World. We welcome submissions on any topic related to the law, policy and reproduction, including avoiding reproduction, public policy related to reproduction, and reproductive regulation post-Roe.

Paper abstracts should be no more than 500 words, accompanied by a descriptive title for the paper proposed. Proposed panels should include a description of the overall topic, as well as a panel title and the titles of all the papers and panelists to be included in the panel. Panels should include no less than 4 proposed panelists. Panel proposals should also be no more than 500 words. All submissions must include the names, e-mail addresses, and full affiliations of all authors.  In the case of panels and co-authored papers, please identify a corresponding author and provide sufficient detail in your abstract or proposal so that reviewers can fully assess your proposal and determine how it will fit with other proposals being reviewed.

There will be two plenary sessions at the conference and some submitted papers might be selected for plenary presentations. If you wish for us to consider your paper for a plenary session, please indicate that desire on your submission.

Please e-mail submissions (in .doc, .docx, or .pdf format) to beyondroe@camlaw.rutgers.edu by April 1, 2013. If you have any questions about the conference, please direct them to Kimberly Mutcherson at mutchers@camden.rutgers.edu.

We invite submissions from other disciplines including philosophy, the social sciences, critical cultural studies (gender and sexuality studies, disability studies, critical race studies, etc.), public health, and others.


Janet Golden, Ph.D.
Professor
History Department
Rutgers University
Camden, NJ 08102
website: http://golden.rutgers.edu/

Published in: on February 19, 2013 at 10:41 am  Leave a Comment  
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